Scroll down slightly. It will then scroll on its own.   -- Speakers on for music,: Amazing Grace

 

In Memory of Zak Unterman
Zachariah Albert Unterman
July 10, 1983 - February 20, 2009
 

 



 



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About the music which is playing . . . Amazing Grace
 

William Wilberforce

William Wilberforce (1759 - 1833)


Read more about this dedicated Christian hero and political activist   . .

                
           

                                  Amazing Grace

Amazing Grace (How sweet the sound)
That sav'd a wretch like me!
I once was lost, but now am found,
Was blind, but now I see.

'Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
And grace my fears reliev'd;
How precious did that grace appear,
The hour I first believ'd!

Thro' many dangers, toils and snare,
I have already come;
'Tis grace has brought me safe thus far,
And grace will lead me home.

The Lord has promised good to me.
His word my hope secures;
He will my shield and portion be,
As long as life endures.

Yes, when this flesh and heart shall fail,
And mortal life shall cease;
I shall profess, within the vail,
A life of joy and peace.

The earth shall soon dissolve like snow,
The sun forbear to shine;
But God, who call'd me here below,
Will be for ever mine.


 

 

Ten Amazing Facts about Amazing Grace

    The words were written by a reformed British slave trader turned Anglican minister, John Newton, who wrote it to accompany a New Year’s Day church service in 1773.
    Amazing Grace is the most covered song in history. Over 3200 different recordings exist.
    The tune we now associate with Amazing Grace wasn’t matched to the words until 1835 in William Walker’s Southern Harmony. Until then it was set to a variety of tunes.
    The final stanza—‘When we’ve been there ten thousand years’—was added by Edwin Othello Excell in 1909 and was taken from another hymn.
    Amazing Grace is considered to be the anthem of the Cherokee Nation because the song was sung on the Trail of Tears during 1838-39.
    The first gospel recording of Amazing Grace was made in 1926 by Rev. H. R. Tomlin.
    Most of the recordings of Amazing Grace have been made since Judy Collins had a surprise pop hit with the song in 1971.
    A survey of British teenagers in the mid-1970s found that the majority thought that Amazing Grace was a love song about a girl named Grace.
    The popular bagpipe version recorded by the Royal Scots Dragoon Guards was based on the hit version by Judy Collins and was only added to an album as an afterthought. Later released as a single, it became a huge international hit.
    Amazing Grace was sung as the funerals of Richard Nixon, Sonny Bono, Barry Goldwater, Joe DiMaggio and John Kennedy Jr.


 

 





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